Woke up to this.

Woke up to let the dog out. What did I see? THIS.

Snow

It’s October. I’m really not ready for this. And it’s still snowing. Mother Nature, did you really have to send the snow this early? Why?

I want to go south now.

Song of the Stars

It’s kind of cliche, you know, saying that the stars make music. Or laugh like children. Or tinkle like bells. But it never really occurred to me that they do make noise!

Team Records Music from Stars

You’ll also note that the sound of one star is very slightly different to the other. That’s because the sound they make depends on their age, size and chemical composition. The technique, called “stellar seismology”, is becoming increasingly popular among astronomers because the sounds give an indication of what is going on in the stars’ interior.

Go to the article and listen to the four audio files. Isn’t it amazing? We can actually hear the stars. We can hear our own sun. Absolutely incredible. I thought it was worth sharing. I think our sun has the prettiest song, but the cluster of stars you can listen to really made my jaw drop. They sound like horns honking on a busy street. Crazy.

So, what did you hear today?

a sense of place.

So I’ve been at the Audubon Center for the Northwoods for two months, but really it only feels like two weeks. Time flies here, partly because we’re so busy, and partly because I don’t own a watch. But the experiences I have had have been so amazing so far. It’s really a learning and growing experience that I need. Actually, I think everyone needs these kinds of experiences. Really.

I’ve been canoeing in the Boundary Waters and I’ve gone on a five day canoe trip down the Mississippi. I’ve met some incredibly nice and talented people, and some people who just aren’t the nice folks in the barn (including a farmer who hates educators and women). I’ve seen a Rendezvous of voyageurs and helped facilitate teambulding for a teachers retreat (where all the adults were older than me and far more experienced). I’ve challenged myself in more ways than I could count, both physically and mentally. I’ve climbed up a high ropes course without breaking down into a mess because of the height, and I managed to survive five days with a group of high schoolers in the middle of nowhere with no bathrooms and little sunshine.

I don’t want to leave. December is coming too fast. But everything happens for a reason and this has been a wonderful experience I will never forget. I don’t think fall block should be limited to Outdoor Education majors. Everyone should be given this chance. It’s amazing.

And that’s it for now. Quick update and nothing more. Hope all is well out there in space!

Fall Block!

So I’m going on hiatus for awhile since I’ll be off campus for four months doing the Fall Block thing (which means I’m in the middle of nowhere jumping off rocks and learning about trees and having a good old time being outside as much as I can).

Though I’ll leave you with a joke that I found hilarious and you’ll probably just think I’m a freak or something:

“Alice Algae and Freddie Fungus took a lichen to each other and now their relationship is on the rocks.”

Mwahahaha. Yeah, I’m probably the only one who would find that funny. GO NATURAL HISTORY! I’m a nerd.

Back on topic, you won’t see me for awhile so I hope you enjoy the beautiful fall season and the changing of the leaves and remember to live. It’s good for the soul. I’ll see you in January.

GLBT Inclusion in Outdoor Education

So I posted a version of this awhile ago, but I just completed my seminar and I thought I would post my revised presentation “Inclusion of GLBT Youth into Outdoor Education” here for your reading pleasure. The biggest change was that I made it more personal for my place of work (the Hartley Nature Center) Feel free to comment and let me know what you think.

The seminar itself went well and I got very positive feedback. I had a powerpoint with it as well, but eh. Keep reading to see my thoughts on this subject.

(more…)