Importance of Outdoor Play

A child’s need for free play is important to their early development. It’s even more important that this free play takes place outside where one can feel the grass between their toes, hear the wind through the trees, smell the moist dirt of the earth, and see the many wonders of the world.

Unfortunately, this doesn’t happen as much as it used to because of the fear parents have that something terrible will happen to their child if they so much as blink.

Children’s Outdoor Play and Learning Environments: Returning to Nature by Randy White & Vicki Stoecklin is a phenomenal article about why children need to be exposed to nature. They give in-depth research on biophilia and how to design outdoor play areas for kids. If you’re a parent, a teacher, or even a kid-at-heart, you’ll want to read this.

I think I’m going to go climb a tree.

(I apologize for the amount of posting lately. I’ve been doing a lot of research and I tend to blog about things I get excited about. We’ll talk about muttaburrasaurs at a later date.)

We are all a bit batty – Bat Education!

Yesterday was Blogathon day, and as you can see, I did not participate. I already had plans yesterday with my girl because two years ago I wrote her a letter asking her out. I don’t think she would have forgiven me if I ditched out on our plans to write in my blog every half hour.

Anyway, I did keep up on my Lee’s blog, which has always proved to be a large storehouse of information for paleo-nerds. Or, really, any nerd interested in the nitpickings of science. Sometimes I feel really smart when I read her blog. Other times… ha.

I wonder why she stays friends with me.

Anyway, it got me thinking a lot about my intentions when I first came to Northland. My plan was to major in Biology and slowly become a Bat Biologist. I love bats. I am a bat freak, I guess. My favorite are the flying foxes, named for their dog-like faces and large ears. They are true fruit bats, found in the Order of Chiroptera (or “hand-wing”). These true fruit bats are actually split into two groups: the Microchiropter (“small hand-wing”) and the Megachiropter (“large hand-wing”).
Click here to continue reading this article.